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  • Three Secrets to Implementing Your Strategic Plan

    I have facilitated close to 200 strategic planning processes. Here are three secrets for a successful strategic planning process. Also you can join me for a webinar “Successfully Implementing Your Strategic Plan” on Thursday, June 17, 12:00-1:15 p.m. CDT. The Magna Publications program is aimed at higher education, but the techniques are applicable to any organization.

    1. Keep the planning committee small—9-12 people. Have multiple opportunities for many people to have input into the process—focus groups, world cafes, surveys, listening sessions, surveys, and the like. A small committee has at least three benefits. First, it is more feasible to get people together with a smaller committee. Second, a group size of 9-12 people has been shown to be more productive than larger or small groups. Finally, a smaller group can analyze data from the stakeholders and make some strategic choices more readily than a larger group. A larger group is more likely to be comfortable with not making clear choices. And strategic planning is about making informed choices.

    2. Use the data. I am continually surprised at the low levels of awareness people often have about what is really going on in many organizations. So often there are pat answers for questions that are not at all supported by data. Common knowledge is notoriously unreliable, so it is essential that a group charged with planning the future of an organization be supported with current data. It is usually not enough to “talk at” the planning committee with the data. The group needs to do something with the data—discuss what it means, compare to other groups, make sense of it.

    A technique I use is to provide various reports to the planning group and ask them in small groups to analyze and then share with the larger group what it all means. (An example of data might be a recent employee survey or a report on gains and losses.) Such activities make the information much more real for the planners.

    3. Assign a “point person” for every priority. Every priority or major goal in the plan must have the name of a point person assigned to it. The role of the point person is not to do all the work, but to ensure that the priority is moving forward as planned. The point person:
    * Is the one to go to with ideas
    * Connects people who are working on similar efforts
    * Helps get the priority moving if it gets stuck
    * Reports on progress at least annually.

    What makes the point person role unique is the fact that one individual is the custodian of a priority or goal even though he or she probably does not have functional authority over all the players. Typically an institutional priority (E.g. expand technology support for learning, serve new groups, provide new offerings) are cross-functional and probably cannot be achieved by one unit. Hence the need for a point person to unify the effort across the organization.

    For more information, see http://kathleenparis.com/home/main/strategic-planning/.